Mechanism of action of topical corticosteroids

In some literature articles, the term mechanism of action and mode of action (MoA) are used interchangeably; typically referring to the way in which the drug interacts and produces a medical effect. However, in actuality, a mode of action describes functional or anatomical changes, at the cellular level, resulting from the exposure of a living organism to a substance. [17] This differs from a mechanism of action, as it is a more specific term that focuses on the interaction between the drug itself and an enzyme or receptor and its particular form of interaction, whether through inhibition , activation , agonism , or antagonism . Furthermore, the term mechanism of action is the main term that is primarily used in pharmacology, whereas mode of action will more often appear in the field of microbiology or certain aspects of biology.

The therapy of rheumatism began thousands of years ago with the use of decoctions or extracts of herbs or plants such as willow bark or leaves, most of which turned out to contain salicylates. Following the advent of synthetic salicylate, Felix Hoffman, working at the Bayer company in Germany, made the acetylated form of salicylic acid in 1897. This drug was named "Aspirin" and became the most widely used medicine of all time. In 1971, Vane discovered the mechanism by which aspirin exerts its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic actions. He proved that aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the activity of the enzyme now called cyclooxygenase (COX) which leads to the formation of prostaglandins (PGs) that cause inflammation, swelling, pain and fever. However, by inhibiting this key enzyme in PG synthesis, the aspirin-like drugs also prevented the production of physiologically important PGs which protect the stomach mucosa from damage by hydrochloric acid, maintain kidney function and aggregate platelets when required. This conclusion provided a unifying explanation for the therapeutic actions and shared side effects of the aspirin-like drugs. Twenty years later, with the discovery of a second COX gene, it became clear that there are two isoforms of the COX enzyme. The constitutive isoform, COX-1, supports the beneficial homeostatic functions, whereas the inducible isoform, COX-2, becomes upregulated by inflammatory mediators and its products cause many of the symptoms of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid and osteoarthritis.

QT Interval Prolongation: NUPLAZID prolongs the QT interval. The use of NUPLAZID should be avoided in patients with known QT prolongation or in combination with other drugs known to prolong QT interval including Class 1A antiarrhythmics or Class 3 antiarrhythmics, certain antipsychotic medications, and certain antibiotics. NUPLAZID should also be avoided in patients with a history of cardiac arrhythmias, as well as other circumstances that may increase the risk of the occurrence of torsade de pointes and/or sudden death, including symptomatic bradycardia, hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia, and presence of congenital prolongation of the QT interval.

Mechanism of action of topical corticosteroids

mechanism of action of topical corticosteroids

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